Share |
You are here: Home About Us Oregon WildBlog
Document Actions

Oregon WildBlog

Oregon Wild Blog RSS

News, notes, trip reports, and the lighter side (of the wilder side) of the Oregon environmental and conservation movement.

Showing blog entries tagged as: Rivers
Stewardship as a Public Policy Component

Stewardship as a Public Policy Component

A policy statement issued by the White House budget office further moves the onus of crafting a workable O&C solution onto Sen. Ron Wyden. It also notes the need for responsible stewardship of public lands.

In a Statement of Administrative Policy released by the White House budget office on Wednesday, President Obama essentially issued a veto threat against public lands bill HR 1526, were it to reach the president's desk in its current form.

The veto threat is significant, as HR 1526 includes the proposed O&C "timber trust" legislation put forward and long championed by Congressmen Peter DeFazio, Greg Walden and Kurt Schrader.

Read More…

Wild Pacific Northwest: Ecoregions of Oregon

Wild Pacific Northwest: Ecoregions of Oregon

Guest blogger, scientist, and Oregon Wild supporter Ivan Phillipsen explores the natural wonders of Washington and Oregon.

By Ivan Phillipsen

Vast expanses of coniferous forest are a distinguishing feature of Oregon's natural environment. But this state contains a remarkable diversity of ecosystems besides the dense, rain-soaked forests of the Coast Range and Cascades. There are deserts here too – as well as alpine meadows, grasslands, oak woodlands, coastal sand dunes, deep canyons, huge wetlands, and barren mountain peaks ringed by glacial ice. Oregon is truly a wonderland of geological and ecological marvels.

Read More…

The Best Process for Removing Klamath River Dams

The Best Process for Removing Klamath River Dams

In a strange twist, the Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement (KBRA) has become the greatest impediment to the proposed removal of Klamath River dams.

The billion-dollar KBRA isn't going anywhere, gives false hope to interests which would benefit from it, and is causing state and federal agencies to ignore worsening conditions for wildlife and endangered species in the basin for fear of upsetting the deal.

As long as there appears to be some hope for the KBRA and the money that would come with it in Congress, government agencies and stakeholders in the Klamath Basin will continue to allow PacifiCorp to continue with their fish-killing status quo. No Act of Congress is necessary to remove the dams.

Read More…

Wild Pacific Northwest: Small Streams Are A Big Deal

Wild Pacific Northwest: Small Streams Are A Big Deal

Guest blogger, scientist, and Oregon Wild supporter Ivan Phillipsen explores the natural wonders of Washington and Oregon.

While hiking Oregon's mountains, you usually can't walk very far before a small, burbling stream cuts across your path. Most of these streams are narrow enough to hop across. They are cold, clear, and often overshadowed by trees, shrubs, and ferns. They're great places to fill your water bottle on a hot summer day.

These are headwater streams. They are born as rivulets of melting snow or as springs, at the upper edges of the watershed.

Scientists have yet to agree on a single way to define a headwater stream. The issue is more complicated than you might think. To keep things simple, let's say a stream is a headwater if it is a terminal branch of the stream network. If you think of the network as having the shape of a tree, with a big river as the tree trunk and smaller streams as the branches, headwaters are like the outermost branch tips of the tree.

Read More…

Water-Starved Klamath Basin Refuges Forced to Drain Marshes

Water-Starved Klamath Basin Refuges Forced to Drain Marshes

Klamath-area National Wildlife Refuges are being forced to drain massive amounts of water, while nothing is being asked of industrial irrigators.

By Wendell Wood

It has come to our attention Lower Klamath and Tule Lake NWRs are being required to deliver 5,600 acre feet of water from the refuge to the Klamath River. The Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) maintains this is being done so the agency won't have to otherwise release additional water from Upper Klamath Lake.

While the BOR claims it needs to do so to maintain Upper Klamath lake levels for endangered species purposes, it is also doing so for the principal purpose of "recharging" the lake to its maximum elevation prior to the onset of the 2013 irrigation season.

Read More…

The Oregon Wild "Get Rich Quick" Scheme

The Oregon Wild "Get Rich Quick" Scheme

How the Equal Access to Justice Act is used to batter conservation groups...while industry gets a pass.

I've written on this topic once before on the Oregon WildBlog, but a recent article in the agriculture journal Capital Press has me thinking about it once again.

The issue: The Equal Access to Justice Act and the very loud claims made by a small few over the supposed desire for environmental advocates to line their pockets by suing the federal government and getting paid back in attorney's fees.

To be clear, we don't get rich here at Oregon Wild by suing the feds...but we do keep our state a richer place by protecting special places that all taxpayers own by (sometimes) dragging the feds into court.

That's why headlines like this one bother me:

"Environmental group gets attorney fees in case it lost"

Read More…

Jim Rogers Featured On Oregon Field Guide

Jim Rogers Featured On Oregon Field Guide

The long-running OPB show celebrates one of Oregon's great wilderness champions, whose efforts resulted in the preservation of two pristine wilderness areas within the heavily-logged Coast Range.

With finely-crafted, in-depth stories about the outdoor history, natural wonders and public lands of Oregon, OPB's long-running Oregon Field Guide program often features guests and topics steeped in Oregon Wild's "wheelhouse."

We were particularly pleased with this week's Field Guide segment on Friends of Elk River founder Jim Rogers, a central figure in Oregon's battle to preserve it's wilderness and wild heritage in the state's heavily-logged and clearcut-scarred Coast Range.

Read More…

Bill's Excellent Adventures - Scout Camp Trail

Bill's Excellent Adventures - Scout Camp Trail

Discover a less-heralded Central Oregon trail that's only accessible on foot.

For years my favorite Central Oregon escape was Smith Rock. But now I escape to the Scout Camp Trail, a spectacular new 3-mile loop that descends past cliffs, caves, and wildflowers to a wild stretch of the Deschutes River opposite the confluence of Whychus Creek. It’s the same tantalizingly beautiful terrain you can see -- but cannot access -- from the Whychus Creek Trail to Alder Springs.

Open only to hikers, the Scout Camp Trail starts out level for 0.3 mile through juniper woods to the canyon rim, where you get views of the Three Sisters. After descending 200 yards into the canyon, the trail forks for the loop. Keep left, switchbacking down slopes brightened with yellow balsamroot sunflowers.

Read More…

Bear, Salmon, Mosquito

Bear, Salmon, Mosquito

A pastor, a scientist, a mayor, and a fisherman walk into a hotel and meet a bear. It could be the setup for a bad joke, but it's not.

Back when I used to teach at OMSI’s outdoor science schools, we played a eco-version of the game “Paper, Rock, Scissors”. In this case, bear ate salmon, salmon ate mosquito, and of course mosquito ate bear. In my current role as Oregon Wild’s Roadless Advocate, I’m turning that game on its head.

At a public meeting tomorrow, we’ll have a bear and a salmon, but they won’t be eating each other, and thankfully there shouldn’t be any mosquitoes in sight. Instead, they’ll be handing out information and collecting public comment at a meeting the Forest Service doesn’t really want you to attend.

Click here for details about the event and here to take action if you can’t make it. Continue reading past the break to find out more.

Read More…

The power of the Sandy River

The power of the Sandy River

Posted by Sean Stevens at Jan 19, 2011 10:45 AM |
Filed under: Video Rivers

A storm hits a mountain and a river goes a little bit crazy.

A local river activist forwarded me this video earlier today. The Sandy River can be quite powerful when rain and snow funnel off Mount Hood.

 

The Sandy River from alexandra erickson on Vimeo.

Blog Categories
BLM (32)
Beetles (4)
Bill's Excellent Adventures (9)
Biomass (1)
Bull Run (4)
Clean Water (33)
Columbia River Gorge (5)
Copper Salmon (4)
County funding (10)
Crater Lake (15)
Dams (15)
Devil's Staircase (6)
Donate (1)
Eastern Oregon (27)
Eastside Legislation (4)
Elk Creek (1)
Endangered Species Act (48)
Energy Development (3)
Eugene (15)
Eyes on the Agencies (12)
Fire (14)
Fish (9)
Flora (75)
Forest Monitoring (19)
Forest Service (41)
Fundraiser (8)
Global Warming (20)
Government (75)
Grazing & Livestock Industry (4)
Hikes & Outings (48)
Humor (2)
Hunting and Fishing (11)
Intern (5)
Klamath (37)
Klamath Basin (7)
Klamath River (6)
LNG (1)
Landslides (1)
Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge (5)
McKenzie (9)
Mining (7)
Model Projects (2)
Molalla River (2)
Mt Hood (14)
Mushrooms (34)
National Forest Management Act (4)
Northwest Oregon (4)
OHVs (3)
Old Growth (66)
Oregon Caves (2)
Oregon Coast (13)
Outdoor Recreation (45)
Partner Event (6)
Party (3)
Photo Contest (9)
Presentation (3)
Private land (2)
Report/Backgrounder (4)
Restoration (2)
Rivers (30)
Roadless (36)
Rogue (9)
Salmon (23)
Science (22)
Siskiyou Wild Rivers (22)
Siuslaw (5)
Snowshoe (2)
Soda Mountain (4)
Southern Oregon (19)
Spotted Owl (5)
State Forests (4)
Stewardship (10)
Sustainability (8)
Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge (5)
Upper Klamath Lake (4)
Video (1)
WOPR (10)
Waldo Lake (7)
Waters (36)
Wild & Scenic (9)
Wild Pacific Northwest (8)
Wilderness (57)
Wildlife (109)
Wolves (68)
Workshop (2)
agribusiness (2)
home (44)
photo contest winners (1)
water (1)
 

powered by Plone | site by Groundwire and Soliton Consulting