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Will the fire funding "fix" actually fix anything?

Low severity fire.

Congress passed a spending bill last week after a month of negotiations produced a $1.3 trillion budget that will keep the federal government open for – gasp – a whole six months. The bill almost failed to become law after a whirlwind few hours that had President Trump threatening a veto, only to reverse himself, sign the bill, and pledge to never let another bill like it pass again.

My Spiritual Home – The Lostine River Canyon

Lostine River Canyon photo courtesy of Leon Werdinger

Last year the Forest Service proposed an illegal logging project on one of Oregon’s most precious landscapes. In response Oregon Wild and Greater Hells Canyon Council took the agency to court. Judy Treman of Walla Walla, Washington has been visiting the Lostine River Canyon for over 70 years. When she heard about the logging project she wrote this piece: 

Welcome to the Upside Down

Recently, the infamous billionaire industrialist and corporate executive, Charles Koch, wrote a mind-boggling opinion article for the Washington Post about the current state of American politics.

March Wolves and Wildlife Update: It's Complicated

It’s human nature to simplify things. But nature doesn’t always work that way. Our latest wildlife update reinforces the fact that nature is complicated and messy and wonderful.
 

Snowshoeing Around the Crater Lake Caldera

Recently, my friend and I circumnavigated the caldera of an ancient volcano. Our four-day snowshoe-backpacking trip around the rim of the Crater Lake was among the most challenging trips we had taken, but it was also among the most rewarding. 

Defending Our State Scenic Waterways

Protected State Scenic Waterway corridors aren’t just pretty places to look at. They’re protected, in part, because they provide important habitat for fish and other wildlife. Salmon, bull trout, steelhead and other fish species all benefit directly from healthy rivers, as do herons, bald and golden eagles, and other birds that may nest or forage in river corridors.

February Wolf & Wildlife Update: Good News Edition!

There’s plenty of bad news out there. So this month we’re happy to have plenty of good news to share.

Bungling of the Bundys: A Postmortem Analysis of Government Incompetence

By Andy Kerr, former Executive Director and Conservation Director of Oregon Wild

[Note: The Bundy band represents both an existential threat and an existential opportunity for America’s public lands. This is the first of four Public Lands Blog posts that examine the government mishandling of the Bundys, the Bundys’ legal troubles, the Bundys’ legal troublemaking, and the opportunities for the conservation community to apply political jujitsu on the Bundy gang to advance the conservation of America’s public lands.]

January Wolf & Wildlife Update

For the first time in decades, multiple wolves were confirmed on the slopes of Mt. Hood!
There’s never a dull moment when it comes to wolves and wildlife. Let’s dive into our first update of 2018!
 
 

"Every Dollar Possible . . . No Matter Who Else Suffers"

This guest blog is from Francis Eatherington, winner of Oregon Wild's 2016 Tim Lillebo Wildlands Warrior Award,  it features her personal story of living amongst Oregon's industrial forestlands. Francis is a longtime forest activist, with a decades long history of fighting for Oregon's Forests, Watersheds, and Wildlife! 

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